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2 edition of Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship? found in the catalog.

Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship?

Dwayne Benjamin

Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship?

by Dwayne Benjamin

  • 301 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Economics and Institute for Policy Analysis, University of Toronto in Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Land use,
  • Agriculture -- Labor productivity

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. [1-2] (2nd group).

    Statementby Dwayne Benjamin.
    SeriesWorking paper series / Dept. of Economics and Institute for Policy Analysis, University of Toronto -- no. 9112, Working paper series (University of Toronto. Institute for Policy Analysis) -- no. 9112
    ContributionsUniversity of Toronto. Institute for Policy Analysis.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD111 .B45 1991
    The Physical Object
    Pagination33, [17] p. :
    Number of Pages33
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18236068M

    “Can unobserved heterogeneity in farmer ability explain the inverse relationship between farm size and productivity” Assuncao and Ghatak. Evidence suggests that there is an inverse relationship between farm size and productivity in agriculture. The usual explanation for this is .   Abstract. This paper revisits the inverse farm size-productivity relationship in Kenya. The study makes two contributions. First, the relationship is examined over a much wider range of farm sizes than most studies, which is particularly relevant in Africa given the recent rise of medium- Cited by: 4.

    The Inverse Relationship between Farm Size and Productivity in Rural Rwanda An Ansoms* Ann Verdoodt** Eric Van Ranst*** December * An Ansoms is a researcher at the Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB), University of Antwerp.   – Whether there exists an inverse relationship (IR) between farm size and its efficiency remains a hotly debated question among agricultural economists. In most studies to date, farm efficiency is measured by land productivity. Thus, the IR actually measures the relationship between farm size and land productivity. The purpose of this paper is to examine and understand the IR from a novel Cited by:

    (). Book review of “Crop Insurance in Theory and Practice,” (). Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship?,” (). Credit Rationing Behavior of Agricultural Lenders: The Iron Law of Interest-Rate : James Roumasset. ADVERTISEMENTS: These are scientific agronomic practices aimed mainly at soil and moisture conservation to improve productivity. 1. Timely Preparatory and Seeding Operations: These are aimed mainly at conservation of the stored soil moisture. This is done by deep tillage and surface tillage. Deep tillage is helpful for kharif crops as it helps break through the [ ].


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Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship? by Dwayne Benjamin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Omitted land quality. Noticing that the inverse productivity relationship was more pronounced between regions than within regions, Sen () suggested that the relationship could be the result of a negative correlation between farm size and unobserved land Size: 1MB.

"Mis-specification in Farm Productivity Analysis: The Role of Land Quality," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(1), pagesMarch. Carter, Michael R, " Identification of the Inverse Relationship between Farm Size and Productivity: An Empirical Analysis of Peasant Agricultural Production," Oxford Economic Papers.

Inverse productivity and land quality. Benjamin (), following a suggestion by Sen (), tests the hypothesis that unobserved variations in land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship in Java rice production.

If high-quality land is subdivided more often than low-quality land, resulting in smaller plots of higher quality Cited by: Anjini Kochar, "Smoothing Consumption by Smoothing Income: Hours-of-Work Responses to Idiosyncratic Agricultural Shocks in Rural India," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol.

81(1), pagesin, Dwayne, "Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages quality land than small farms, and if land quality variables are not included in the analysis, this can lead to a spurious IR.

We test for hypothesis H2 by estimating models without and with. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link)Author: Dwayne Benjamin.

Can unobserved heterogeneity in farmer ability explain the inverse relationship between farm size and productivity Article in Economics Letters 80(2) August with Reads. that purely behavioral mechanisms can drive productivity.

Keywords: inverse relationship, productivity, behavioral, causal bounds, perceptions, edge e ect Acknowledgements: Thanks to Clark Gray, PI on the NSF-funded survey (BCS) that collected our data, and co-PIs Ephraim Nkonya, Darrell Shultze, Kayuki Kaizzi, and Leah Size: 1MB.

the inverse size-productivity relationship and generate three important nd-ings. First, the standard inverse relationship is a plot-level phenomenon, ren-dering conventional household- or farm-level explanations insu cient.

Sec-ond, the plot perimeter/area ratio, re ecting an \edge e ect" discussed in theFile Size: 1MB. Abstract. The relationship between farm size and land productivity is a disputed one in the field of agricultural development.

Based on the original data of Buck’s rural social survey, this study has calculated the land productivity differences of small, small and median, median, median and large, and large farms to verify the argument that small farms have an advantage and explore household Author: Hao Hu, Minjie Yu.

We use a large national farm panel from India from to to show that the inverse relationship between farm size and output per unit of land weakened significantly over time.

A key reason was the substitution of capital for labor in response to nonagricultural labor demand. The first regularity is well-known; that is the farm-size productivity inverse relationship (hereafter referred to as farm-size IR), first noted by Chayanov () in Russia and later rediscovered by Sen () in India.

It states that land productivity decreases with farm by: Benjamin, D. () ‘Can Unobserved Land Quality Explain The Inverse Productivity Relationship?’ Journal of Development Economics, 46, 51– CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: 4.

So how one understands the inverse size-productivity puzzle matters. Using plot-level panel data from Uganda, we provide highly suggestive evidence of causality, for the rst time in this literature, to the best of our knowledge.

We then test the familiar explanations and nd that they fail to explain the observed inverse relationship. inverse relationship, we focus specifically on the concept of productivity. The Unconditional Relationship between Land Productivity and Farm Size Historically, land productivity is by far the most commonly used measure in the literature on the inverse relationship (IR).

File Size: KB. Productivity of Lands: Concept and Definition: Here we discuss relationship between size of lands and the productivity of lands as to whether the small farms are more productive as compared with large farms.

Normally, it is said that there exists an inverse relationship. In developing agricultures, past research has suggested an inverse relationship between farm productivity and size.

The raw data from China show such an inverse relationship. However, the inverse relationship disappears after we instrument for land area using the fact that one of the objectives of the land allocation process in rural China is Cited by: The inverse farm size productivity relationship: new evidence from Sub-Sahara African countries8/15 Farm Distribution by Productivity Scandizzo, P.

L and Savastano, S. This paper revisits the decades-old puzzle of the inverse plot-size productivity relationship, which states that land productivity decreases as plot size increases.

Existing empirical studies on the inverse plot-size productivity relationship define land Cited by: The empirical inverse relationship is likely due to the failure to account for the unobserved land quality that is unevenly distributed across the farm size continuum, rather than inherent to China's agriculture Inverse relationship between productivity and farm size: The case of China.

This paper revisits the decades-old puzzle of the inverse plot-size productivity relationship, which states that land productivity decreases as plot size increases. Existing empirical studies on the inverse plot-size productivity relationship define land productivity or yields as self-reported production divided by plot by: Land quality indicators: aspects of land use, land, soil and plant nutrients.

R. Brinkman, Land and Water Development Division, FAO. Rome, Italy. The UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) in its work programme indicated the need for indicators of sustainability linked .In countries such as India, population pressure and food demand mean that land productivity (yield) is a prime consideration in determining the adoption of alternative crop production technologies.

To date, most research has indicated an average yield penalty of around 10% with DSR compared with PTR, but losses can be as much as 33% (Table ).The higher yield penalties in DSR are primarily.